Apple can’t sell the iPhone 6 in Beijing anymore!

Written by Mark Hines

The Cupertino-based manufacturer is dealing with some serious issues with one of the most important markets of the world, as a Chinese regulator requested to pause iPhone 6 sales in Beijing, as the model is too similar to a competitor’s product.

According to Ubergizmo, Chinese manufacturer Shenzen Beili opened a patent dispute, claiming that the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are way too similar to its 100C model. Currently, sales are banned only in Beijing, but this doesn’t mean that Apple will simply ignore the situation, as an appeal to this decision is expected. In the meantime, both models will continue to be sold, until the court reviews the ruling.

Several analysts have investigated the issue and they believe that the ruling won’t affect the overall iPhone sales in China.

“iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus as well as iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus and iPhone SE models are all available for sale today in China,” the manufacturer said in a statement. “We appealed an administrative order from a regional patent tribunal in Beijing last month and as a result the order has been stayed pending review by the Beijing IP Court.”

This isn’t the first time when Apple has issues with a Chinese manufacturer. Back in May, they lost an iPhone trademark dispute with a Xintong Tiandi Technology, a leather goods manufacturer who was using the term “iPHONE” on its leather products since 2007.

Shortly after the news about the patent dispute emerged, Apple’s shares fell 2.3 percent, which is huge, considering that China is the company’s second-biggest global market. This comes in contrast with all similar stories we’ve seen until now.

Not once has Apple filed complaints against smaller Chinese manufacturers, which were copying the design of their smartphones to the last details, but they have also accused one of their main competitors, Samsung, of copying design elements or patent infringements. However, tech fans are already used with this type of news about the two companies, so it doesn’t come as a surprise anymore.


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Mark Hines

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